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Fixing a Corrupted UEFI Partition in Windows 8 or 8.1 We get this question often lately. Here’s the scenario: I was trying to re-size or copy my UEFI (Unified Extensible Firmware Interface) for one reason or another and now I can’t boot my Windows 8 or 8.1 PC. There are some free software solutions out there some seem to work some don’t. Most often when we receive this question the user has tried to use the Windows Copy command and the Windows Disk Management Tool (WDMT) to copy the UEFI partitions contents to larger partition, then uses the WDMT to delete the old UEFI partition then re-size the new one, set the new UEFI partition to active and then re-boot. This is were the trouble starts. At this point the BCD store is corrupted and the system will not boot. Here is a fix that I hope will help. Firstly, boot from a Windows 8 recovery drive (CD/DVD/USB). If you don’t have a recovery drive (and this is likely because most new machines don’t come with one), then you will either have to install the drive into another Windows 8 machine or obtain a Windows 8 recovery drive, or boot from the recovery partition of the boot drive (If this option works at this point). Don’t even bother with the automated recovery process, it will not work as it cannot find a Windows partition. You will need to choose the language and time settings. Choose ‘Repair Your Computer’. Choose ‘Troubleshooting’. Choose “Advanced Options’. Next choose ‘Command Prompt’. Next, we’re going to use the DISKPART tool to verify that the UEFI partition has a drive letter assignment. Enter ‘DISKPART’ (Enter) (In this test case we removed all other drives except the boot HDD and DVD, so we know the disk 0 is our boot HDD) DISKPART> sel disk 0 Disk 0 is now the selected disk. DISKPART> list vol There was no drive letter assignment to our UEFI partition (volume 3) so we need to assign a drive letter. DISKPART> sel vol 3 Volume 3 is the selected volume. DISKPART> assign letter=E: DiskPart successfully assigned the drive letter or mount point. Exit DiskPart tool (Enter EXIT) Next, we need to change to the boot folder on the UEFI volume. Change to the UEFI volume into the boot folder. Depending on the way Windows was installed this path maybe one of the following. cd /d E:\Boot\ cd /d E:\EFI\Microsoft\Boot\ cd /d E:\ESD\Windows\EFI\Microsoft\Boot\ Now we will need to enter three command lines to repair the BCD store. Again depending on the way Windows was installed these may not all be necessary, however command lines are are unnecessary will not affect the outcome. bootrec /fixboot bootrec /fixmbr bootrec /rebuildmbr That’s it, if all went well the BCD store should be repaired, and the system will once again boot.

We get this question often lately. Here's the scenario: I was trying to re-size or copy my UEFI (Unified Extensible Firmware Interface) for one reason or another and now I can't boot my Windows 8 or 8.1 PC. There are some free software solutions out there some seem to work some don't. Most often when we receive this question the user has tried to use the Windows Copy command and the Windows Disk Management Tool (WDMT) to copy the UEFI partitions contents to larger partition, then uses the WDMT to delete the old UEFI partition then re-size the new one, set the new UEFI partition to active and then re-boot. This is were the trouble starts. At this point the BCD store is corrupted and the system will not boot. Here is a fix that I hope will help. Firstly, boot from a Windows 8 recovery drive (CD/DVD/USB). If you don't have a recovery drive (and this is likely because most new machines don't come with one), then you will either have to install the drive into another Windows 8 machine or obtain a Windows 8 recovery drive, or boot from the recovery partition of the boot drive (If this option works at this point). Don't even bother with the automated recovery process, it will not work as it cannot find a Windows partition.
  1. You will need to choose the language and time settings.
  2. Choose 'Repair Your Computer'.
  3. Choose 'Troubleshooting'.
  4. Choose "Advanced Options'.
  5. Next choose 'Command Prompt'.
Next, we're going to use the DISKPART tool to verify that the UEFI partition has a drive letter assignment. Enter 'DISKPART' (Enter) (In this test case we removed all other drives except the boot HDD and DVD, so we know the disk 0 is our boot HDD) DISKPART> sel disk 0 Disk 0 is now the selected disk. DISKPART> list vol There was no drive letter assignment to our UEFI partition (volume 3) so we need to assign a drive letter. DISKPART> sel vol 3 Volume 3 is the selected volume. DISKPART> assign letter=E: DiskPart successfully assigned the drive letter or mount point. Exit DiskPart tool (Enter EXIT) Next, we need to change to the boot folder on the UEFI volume. Change to the UEFI volume into the boot folder. Depending on the way Windows was installed this path maybe one of the following. cd /d E:\Boot\ cd /d E:\EFI\Microsoft\Boot\ cd /d E:\ESD\Windows\EFI\Microsoft\Boot\ Now we will need to enter three command lines to repair the BCD store. Again depending on the way Windows was installed these may not all be necessary, however command lines are are unnecessary will not affect the outcome.
  1. bootrec /fixboot
  2. bootrec /fixmbm
That's it, if all went well the BCD store should be repaired, and the system will once again boot.  

How can I repair the Windows 8 EFI Bootloader?

Firstly, boot from a UEFI Windows 8 recovery disk (CD/DVD/USB) - I found that the automated recovery process didn't find the correct Windows partition, nor when I managed to add it to BCD settings would it make it reliably bootable e.g. using BCDEDIT I got it to find and launch the Windows partition but it refused to cold boot or would not "keep" the settings after a 2nd reboot or power off. Go into the Advanced options and run the Command Prompt. Enter diskpart to use the DiskPart tool to ensure you have all the right partitions and to identify your EFI partition - the key thing here is that your EFI partition is formatted as FAT32:
DISKPART> sel disk 0

Disk 0 is now the selected disk.

DISKPART> list vol

  Volume ###  Ltr  Label        Fs     Type        Size     Status     Info
  ----------  ---  -----------  -----  ----------  -------  ---------  --------
  Volume 0     E                       DVD-ROM         0 B  No Media
  Volume 1     C                NTFS   Partition    195 GB  Healthy    Boot
  Volume 2         WINRE        NTFS   Partition    400 MB  Healthy    Hidden
  Volume 3                      FAT32  Partition    260 MB  Healthy    System
Then assign a drive letter to the EFI partition:
DISKPART> sel vol 3

Volume 3 is the selected volume.

DISKPART> assign letter=b:

DiskPart successfully assigned the drive letter or mount point.
Exit DiskPart tool by entering exit and at the command prompt run the following:
cd /d b:\EFI\Microsoft\Boot\

bootrec /fixboot
Delete or rename the BCD file:
ren BCD BCD.bak
Use bcdboot.exe to recreate BCD store:
bcdboot c:\Windows /l en-gb /s b: /f ALL
The /f ALL parameter updates the BIOS settings including UEFI firmware/NVRAM, /l en-gb is to localise for UK/GB locale. The localisation defaults to US English, or use en-US. Reboot and cross your fingers. This gave me headaches. I was going in circles for a long while. There isn't a lot of reliable info about fixing UEFI/Windows 8 at the time of writing. To re-enable Hyper-V, I also had to run the following from an Administrator Command Prompt within Windows after rebooting:
bcdedit /set {default} hypervisorlaunchtype Auto
bcdedit /set {default} nx OptIn

Wireless networks and windows XP , a quick how to

How to remove existing wireless network profile in Windows XP

Step 1 Open Control panel, select and double click Network Connections.  Step 2 Select Wireless Network Connection, right click it and select Properties.

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 Step 3 Choose “Wireless Networks” tab and select existing network in preferred networks, then click Remove.

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  Step 4   Click OK.  and the network should be removed

Step 5  - Or how to add a Wireless network connection in windows XP

Then Select Wireless Network Connection, right click it, select and click View Available Wireless Networks.

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  Step 6 Click Refresh Network list to view available wireless networks. Select the correct network which you want to connect, double click it or click Connect button.

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  Step 7 If the wireless network is secured, it will pop up a window asking for the key/password. Pay attention to the case of the characters, so if they are in CAPITALS then replicate the same  in the password box. This is a common error and can drive people to despair as they beleive they have inserted the correct code.  Remember passwords are usually case sensitive.

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Step 8 Enter the correct Key then click Connect, wait for a while, you will connect to this wireless network.

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  NOTE:
  1.  If it keeps connecting to the network or acquiring IP address, please check if you had entered the correct key/password.
  2.  If it shows that the connection is Limited or no connectivity, please ensure that you had enabled DHCP server on the wireless router/access point.
  3. There maybe a button you need to press on the router to enable you to connect new devices to your network
  4. Shouting at it wont make it work any quicker, but may make you feel good.
   

Where to get that windows 7 disk

Ok... so you lost your Windows 7 install disk... well as luck would have it.... below is a list of direct downloads .. of course you will still need to have a valid key, but if you are doing a re-install then a quick jellybean or look at the sticker on your machine and your away.. All of the downloads are circa 2gb in size so its no doubt a good idea to get somewhere with a good internet link and a download manager to make things run smoothly...

Download Windows 7 Ultimate 32-bit x86 ISO

Download Windows 7 Ultimate 64-bit x64 ISO

Download Windows 7 Home Premium 32-bit x86 ISO

Download Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit x64 ISO

Download Windows 7 Professional 32-bit x86 ISO

Download Windows 7 Professional 64-bit x64 ISO

 

Download Windows 7 SP1 Integrated ISO

yes I put both up as some people prefer the original...

32-bit Windows 7 Ultimate x86 SP1 (bootable)

64-bit Windows 7 Ultimate x64 SP1 (bootable)

32-bit Windows 7 Professional x86 SP1 (bootable)

64-bit Windows 7 Professional x64 SP1 (bootable)

32-bit Windows 7 Home Premium x86 SP1 (bootable)

64-bit Windows 7 Home Premium X64 SP1 (bootable)